Posts Tagged ‘esa’

For those wondering what disabilities qualify for individual assistance animals, it can be hard to determine which kind would offer the best in terms of service and companionship. Service animals and emotional support animals can get confusing from time to time. Here is a basic outline of what the similarities and differences are between service dogs and emotional support animals to help you determine what kind of animal you qualify for:

Service Animals: Service animals can be dogs or miniature horses and must be trained to provide a task for their disabled owners. Dogs (and miniature horses) only – Under the American Disabilities Act, only dogs can be eligible as service animals. These animals are legally recognized under government policies as having specific rights and qualifications in comparison to other animals due to their ability to be trained in particular tasks and handle a person’s disability. Miniature horses also have recognition under the ADA but have other provisions regarding them. Have advanced levels of training specific to a person’s disability – Service dogs are trained in tasks related to a person’s disability, as well as house training and other jobs. For instance, guide dogs, a type of service dog, must be trained to help assist a disabled person who is blind or visually impaired. Have nationally recognized certification programs – Organizations such as Assistance Dogs International have certification and training programs for service animals. The ADA requires that service animals be trained to help serve their disabled owners. Have access to public spaces – The ADA allows service animals to have access to public spaces. Business owners, managers, and staff have limited access to the questions they can ask in regards to service animals and their disabled owners. Emotional Support Animals: Can range in a wide variety of animals – Animals such as dogs, cats, rabbits, and guinea pigs can all qualify as emotional support animals. ESAs are considered to be “owned pets,” unlike service animals. While there are no limits to what an ESA can be, it’s essential to take into account the state legislature and their definitions of what ESAs are. ESAs are not specially trained to perform tasks – As of current, there is no national legislation regulating the training that qualifies ESAs. Although numerous organizations can help train ESAs, ESAs are not federally recognized as a kind of service animal. Although coined under the terms assistance animals or companion animals, training ESAs are considered optional, but recommended. Do not have access to public spaces – ESAs operate under different legislation and are protected under the Fair Housing Act. Hence, ESAs have limited access to public spaces. Require a licensed professional to be considered an ESA – Pets/animals can only be considered ESAs if they have an ESA letter written and approved by a mental health licensed professional, including therapists, counselors, psychiatrists, and psychologists. By having an ESA letter, ESAs can gain access to housing despite no-pets policies and at no extra cost.

Both provide assistance related to a person’s disability, but how they perform those services differ from another. They both are not required to be trained professionally, as each owner can self-train their animals to serve specific tasks.

Is an emotional support animal for you? See if you qualify. Get your ESA in three easy steps. Legal protections for a service dog Service dogs are protected under the ADA and can go wherever their owners go.

The Department of Justice published the Americans with Disabilities Act to show the requirements related to service dogs. By providing regulations about service dogs, the ADA can help clarify issues related to service dogs. The ADA has legal protections outlined for public awareness, aiming at educating people the regulations involved with service animals, which include:

Staff may ask only two specific questions in regards to service dogs: Is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? And what work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Staff is thus not allowed to request any documentation for the dog, require demonstrations of the dog’s abilities, or inquire about the nature of the person’s disability. For businesses that serve the public goods and services, the ADA does not require those entities to modify policies if it would “fundamentally alter” the nature of those services provided to the public. This would be considered an exception for staff to prohibit a service animal if the animal alters those services. Service dogs may be excluded if the handler cannot control the animal. Controlling the animal refers to the service dog being under the handler’s control at all times. The animal must be leashed, harnessed or tethered while in public places unless it interferes with the service animal’s ability to perform its tasks. If those methods of control interfere, the handler must use voice, signal or other means to control the animal.

These are a few examples of the protections that service dogs have for the public. These service animals have legal protections as long as the handler has control and adequate training in place for the animal so it can perform its duties for the disabled owner.

Legal protections for Emotional Support Animals Emotional support animals are protected by the Fair Housing Act.

While ESAs don’t have specific protections under the ADA, there are other federal legislations that help clarify the definitions of ESAs and their rights within those limited spaces.

Emotional support animals have specifical protections and protocols, according to the Department of Housing’s Fair Housing Act of 1988. Under the Fair Housing Act, ESAs are categorized under the term assistance animals, which the FHA defines them as animals that work, provide assistance and perform tasks for a person with a disability, or provides emotional support alleviating one or more symptoms of a person’s disability. Landlords must modify their policies to permit a person with a disability to live with a service animal or emotional support animal. For those with ESAs, the applicant for housing may need to submit medical documentation, such as an ESA letter, showing the animal provides support and mitigates one symptom of that person’s disability.  

Which disabilities qualify for a service dog?

The Americans with Disabilities Act defines a person with a disability as individuals with a physical or mental impairment that significantly limits one or more major life activities. These disabilities can range from physical to psychological, but the person must be regarded as an impairment and have a record of that impairment. Physical or mental disabilities can include diseases, visual, speech, and hearing impairments, psychological conditions such as cerebral palsy, autism, epilepsy, mental retardation, and health conditions such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes, drug addiction, and alcoholism. If the impairment limits activities central to everyday life, such as eating, speaking, walking, and performing manual tasks, then the person can qualify as disabled under the ADA and thus qualify for a service dog.

Which disabilities qualify for an ESA?

Emotional support animals perform disability-related functions focusing on providing emotional support, aiding in mental disabilities such as depression, anxiety, PTSD, and bipolar disorder. ESA’s focus more on mental and emotional disabilities than physical. While the Fair Housing Act combines emotional support animals under the term assistance animals, a person with a disability who has an ESA must be able to show a tenant that they have a mental impairment, show a record of that mental impairment, and be regarded as disabled due to this impairment. (HUD).

Depending on the type of disability you have, both service dogs and emotional support animals offer benefits and different areas of specialties. If you desire a service animal or emotional support animal, speak with your health professional about your options and discuss with them what opportunities will serve you best.

When we say “Pitbull,” it may unfairly conjure up images of a blood-thirsty beast out to destroy anything in its path. Nothing could be further from the truth.

The Pitbull has gotten a bad reputation over the years due to cruel people using them for illegal dog fighting rings. These dogs are victims of animal abuse like any other helpless canine that finds themselves in the hands of an unscrupulous individual.

The term “Pitbull” is also a misnomer. There is no recognized breed of Pitbull, but instead, four registered Bully breeds that get lumped into one category. These include the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Bully, and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

All of these “Pitbulls” are battling their way out of an unfair image. Some are even finding their way into the world of therapy work.

In this post, we will explore the question; can a Pitbull be a therapy dog?

General Traits of the Pit Bull

All of the “Pitbull” breeds share similar traits. They are all blocky in build with square heads and muzzles. Despite their shorter stature, the Bully breeds are also deceptively strong.

They all have very short, straight coats that come in a variety of colors.

Personality wise, the Bully breeds tend to be on the stubborn side (this is their Terrier” nature coming into play). However, that doesn’t mean they aren’t highly trainable. With the right techniques (a gentle, yet firm hand, positive reinforcement, and a willingness to help the breed overcome its lousy rep) these dogs do make wonderful companions.

The Bully breeds have a strong need to please, and therefore are very loyal, loving, and devoted animals. They crave human attention and do not do well left alone for long periods-of-time.

When it comes to exercise, your Bully will need 60 to 90 minutes of vigorous exercise once or twice a day. This can include long walks or hikes, jogging, playing in the park or getting your dog into agility or flyball activities.

 Get your Therapy Dog Identification Card Here

What is a Therapy Dog?

Unlike a service dog that must provide a task for a disabled individual, the therapy dog is used for comfort and support.

There are three types of Therapy Dogs;

Personal Therapy Dog (aka Emotional Support Animal) – a dog (or other species of animal) that provides general comfort and unconditional love. It does not need to be specially trained for a task. Requires an ESA letter and can travel and live with you. Assisted Therapy Dog – one that joins the handler (typically a doctor, therapist, teacher, etc.) at the workplace to help clients, students, etc. with stress and anxiety. Visiting Therapy Dog – one that is brought into hospitals, schools, hospices, nursing homes, etc. to interact with the people. They are only there for a short period-of-time. The Pit Bull as a Therapy Dog

Despite many communities imposing breed-specific bans on the Pitbull, there are just as many regions trying to break the stigma.

It is a fact that the “Pitbull” makes an excellent Therapy Dog. Their natural love for people, their eager-to-please attitude, and their ability to withstand pain give them the innate ability to be tolerant in situations where some dogs may not be so.

According to Pitbull Lovers;

“Some people have a hard time getting around, and it’s not altogether unlikely their toes might get stepped on or run over by a wheelchair. I worked a session where a woman had a sensory problem, and she had a compulsive need to pinch things extremely hard once she got a hold of them.

While she never pinched Angel, she could have if we were not paying attention and the outcome would have been Angel having discomfort but not reacting with aggression.

Another breed might have been driven to biting or growling at a person like this.”

All these qualities are what’s making the Pitbull a popular choice in the world of therapy work.

Can a Pitbull Be a Therapy Dog? 

Pitbulls do make excellent therapy dogs, but as with any breed, early socialization and obedience training are vital to having a well-rounded dog. If you want to fly or live with your personal therapy dog (emotional support dog), you must get a letter from a licensed therapist to verify your need.

If you want to get into therapy work or think a canine would be the perfect solution to your emotional issues, then be sure to seek out a reputable breeder or rescue organization.

We all deserve to have a happy, healthy life. The Pitbull is no exception.

Anyone who has ever owned a pet knows that animals are often our best source of comfort when we are feeling down or unwell. For people who struggle with emotional or mental illnesses or disabilities, emotional support animals provide much-needed companionship, comfort, security, and love. Animals have a remarkable way of making us feel better, and emotional support animals truly do provide emotional support to the people who need it most.

What Is an Emotional Support Animal?

There is some confusion surrounding what an emotional support animal, or ESA, is and is not. By definition, an ESA is an animal that provides therapeutic benefits and helps alleviate the symptoms their handlers experience due to a mental or emotional disability. They require minimal training, and, unlike service dogs, they do not need to perform a specific task to help their handlers.

The most important job of an emotional support animal is to provide companionship and comfort to its owner to make it easier to accomplish one or more major life activities, including caring for oneself, working, performing manual tasks, sleeping, walking, and numerous other activities. Emotional support animals are commonly prescribed to persons struggling with depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, difficulty sleeping, etc.

Who Qualifies for Emotional Support Animals?

Roughly 18% of American adults live with some type of emotional or mental disability, many of whom could benefit from owning an emotional support animal. Unfortunately, many of them do not realize that they may qualify for one. Mental health professionals prescribe ESAs to people living with a wide variety of disabilities and illnesses. In addition to helping people with depression, anxiety, and PTSD, emotional support animals can help people of all ages who struggle with ADHD and autism spectrum disorders.

Emotional support animal letters are provided by licensed mental health workers and other medical professionals. The letter indicates that the patient is limited by their disability and requires an emotional support animal as part of their treatment.

How Emotional Support Animals Provide Emotional Support

Emotional support animals provide emotional support simply by being there for their handlers. They provide unconditional love, and just spending time with a loyal companion can really make someone who suffers from a mental disorder feel better. They also create a sense of purpose and responsibility. Feeding, talking, bathing, and taking care of an animal can make a person feel valuable and important. This can be extremely helpful for people who struggle with depression and may not feel a great sense of self-worth on their own. Because they need to be taken care of, animals also help keep their owners more active. It’s nearly impossible to spend all day curled up in bed when there is a furry companion relying on you to provide for their every need.

While they can’t talk back, emotional support animals are great listeners. They are never too busy to lend an ear when their owners need them, and they never judge. They’re also great at keeping secrets, so they act at furry therapists that people can talk to about absolutely anything. Having another living being to confide in – even in that being isn’t human – helps people work through their problems. It also helps alleviate the feelings of loneliness and isolation that many people who struggle with depression and other mental health problems experience.

Talking with a therapist or counselor is beneficial and highly recommended for people who have mental and emotional illnesses and disabilities. Those people aren’t always available, though. With an emotional support animal, you always have someone by your side that you can talk to at any time of the day or night. There is no waiting room or expensive co-pay to worry about – just a loving companion who will always be there to provide a shoulder to cry on when you need it most.

Emotional support animals provide support when their handlers must face difficult situations. If anxiety prevents you from traveling, for example, an ESA can provide the comfort you need to make it through a long flight. They help their owners feel more confident in anxiety-inducing situations, and they can even make it easier to meet new people. For people with mental or emotional disabilities or illnesses, emotional support animals help provide the support they need to live full, independent lives.